Think clown shows are for kids?

Think again.

The Object of Constellations, April 20-24, 2016

Posted by on March 26, 2016 in Upcoming

The Object of Constellations, April 20-24, 2016

When we peer into the sky, we peer into our past.

Astronomy, cosmology, and mythology coalesce in this uncommon adaptation of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s classic novella, The Little Prince, intended for adult audiences.

Part theatre, part installation art, The Object of Constellations is a site-specific performance designed for and performed in the University of Alberta’s astronomical observatory.

 

 

Details:

  • April 20: Preview
  • April 21-24: Performances
  • Performances ongoing between 8:30 and 10:30 pm.
  • This is a non-ticketed installation-style performance. Visitors are welcome to enter the space any time between 8:30 and 10:15 pm as long as there is space (maximum capacity of 60). We recommend you allow 40 mins to 1 hour for your visit, but you are welcome to stay as long or as short a time as you like.
  • Installation spaces have limited accessibility, and include outdoor spaces. Please dress for the weather.
  • Admission is free (cash donations will be accepted at the door to help recoup production costs – tax receipts will not be issued).

Location:
Department of Physics Astronomical Observatory, University of Alberta: CCIS 5-240. Note: Take the West elevators to the 5th floor.

Directions: https://uofa.ualberta.ca/physics/outreach/department-of-physics-astronomical-observatory/directions

Creative Team:

Concept, writer & performer: Christine Lesiak
Director & dramaturge: Suzanne Martin
Stage management: Andrea Murphy
Sound design: Michael Caron with Maryam Zarei
Lighting & co-projection design: Jeff Osterlin
Mechanical designer, builder & co-projection design: Ian Walker
Design consultant: Marissa Kochanski
Front of house & volunteer coordinator: Tonya Chrystian
Dept. of Physics & science consultant: Dr. Sharon Morsink
MFA program supervisors: Dr. Piet Defraeye & Michael Kennard

Presented in partial fulfillment of Christine Lesiak’s Master of Fine Arts Theatre Practice thesis, The University of Alberta.

This project would not be possible without support from:

  • The Department of Drama, University of Alberta
  • The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
  • The Canadian Federation of University Women
  • Department of Physics at the University of Alberta, for use of the observatory